science

Jumeaux de quasar brillants dans « Cosmic One »

L’impression de cet artiste montre que les astronomes utilisant une combinaison de télescopes terrestres et spatiaux, y compris Gemini North à Hawaï, ont détecté une paire de quasars actifs étroitement liés – la marque d’une paire de galaxies fusionnées – vues lorsque l’univers existait. Seulement trois milliards d’années. La découverte met en lumière l’évolution des galaxies à un « midi cosmique », une période de l’histoire de l’univers où les galaxies ont connu des explosions de formation d’étoiles furieuses. Cette fusion marque également un système sur le point de devenir une galaxie elliptique géante. Crédit : Gemini Observatory International/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/M. Zamani, J. Da Silva

Gemini North aide à confirmer la nature d’un système cosmique sur le point de devenir une galaxie elliptique géante.

Des astronomes utilisant une combinaison de télescopes terrestres et spatiaux, dont Gemini North à Hawaï, ont découvert une paire de quasars actifs étroitement liés – la marque d’une paire de galaxies fusionnantes – vus alors que l’univers n’avait que trois milliards d’années . La découverte met en lumière l’évolution des galaxies à un « midi cosmique », une période de l’histoire de l’univers où les galaxies ont connu des explosions de formation d’étoiles furieuses. Cette fusion marque également un système sur le point de devenir une galaxie elliptique géante.

Les galaxies grandissent et évoluent en fusionnant avec d’autres galaxies, mélangeant leurs milliards d’étoiles, déclenchant des explosions de formation d’étoiles puissantes et alimentant souvent des trous noirs supermassifs centraux pour produire des quasars lumineux qui éclipsent toute la galaxie. Finalement, certaines de ces fusions sont devenues d’énormes galaxies elliptiques contenant des trous noirs des milliards de fois la masse de notre soleil. Bien que les astronomes aient observé un véritable amas de fusions de galaxies avec plus d’un quasar dans notre voisinage cosmique, les exemples lointains, vus alors que l’univers n’avait qu’un quart de son âge actuel, sont très rares et difficiles à trouver.

En exploitant une combinaison d’observatoires terrestres et spatiaux – y compris Gemini North, la moitié de l’Observatoire international Gemini, qui est exploité par la NSF[{ » attribute= » »>NOIRLab — a team of astronomers has discovered a closely bound pair of actively feeding supermassive black holes — quasars. This discovery is the first confirmed detection of a pair of supermassive black holes in the same galactic real estate at ‘cosmic noon’ — a period of frenetic star formation at a time when the Universe was only three billion years old.

Previous observations have identified similar systems in the early stages of merging, when the two galaxies could still be considered clearly separate entities. But these new results show a pair of quasars blazing away in such close proximity, a mere 10,000 light-years apart, that their original host galaxies are likely well on their way to becoming a single giant elliptical galaxy.

Searching for pairs of supermassive black holes so close to each other during this early epoch is like trying to find the proverbial needle in a haystack. The challenge is that most black-hole pairs are too close to distinguish individually. To definitively detect such a system, the two supermassive black holes need to be actively accreting and shining as quasars simultaneously, conditions that are extremely rare. Statistically, for every 100 supermassive black holes only one should be actively accreting at a given time.

Astronomers know, however, that the distant Universe should be brimming with pairs of supermassive black holes embedded within merging galaxies. The first hints of such a system were found in data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which revealed two closely aligned pinpoints of light in the distant Universe.

To verify the true nature of this system, the team searched through ESA’s Gaia observatory’s vast database and found that this system had an apparent “jiggle,” which could be the result of sporadic changes in a black hole’s feeding activity.

The team then used the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) and GNIRS on Gemini North, which provided the team with independent measurements of the distance to the quasars and confirmed that the two objects were both quasars rather than a chance alignment of a single quasar with a foreground star. Further studies with the W.M. Keck Observatory, NSF’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, and NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory also helped to confirm these observations.

“The confirmation process wasn’t easy and we needed an array of telescopes covering the spectrum from X-rays to the radio to finally confirm that this system is indeed a pair of quasars, instead of, say, two images of a gravitationally lensed quasar,” said co-author Yue Shen, an astronomer at the University of Illinois.

“We don’t see a lot of double quasars at this early time. And that’s why this discovery is so exciting. Knowing about the progenitor population of black holes will eventually tell us about the emergence of supermassive black holes in the early Universe, and how frequent those mergers could be,” said graduate student Yu-Ching Chen of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, lead author of this study, which is published in the journal Nature.

For more on this discovery:

Reference: “A close quasar pair in a disk–disk galaxy merger at z = 2.17” by Yu-Ching Chen, Xin Liu, Adi Foord, Yue Shen, Masamune Oguri, Nianyi Chen, Tiziana Di Matteo, Miguel Holgado, Hsiang-Chih Hwang and Nadia Zakamska, 5 April 2023, Nature.
DOI: 10.1038/s41586-023-05766-6

READ  La NASA a rapporté que le soleil était très actif au mois d'octobre, qui est plein d'éruptions solaires

Delphine Perrault

"Solutionneur de problèmes extrêmes. Chercheur avide de bacon. Écrivain maléfique. Geek du Web. Défenseur des zombies depuis toujours."

Articles similaires

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Bouton retour en haut de la page
Fermer
Fermer